Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Design Methods

Mathematical and computational methods for physical and mechanical system design

Showing 4 results for Design RSS
For the past decade, cybersecurity threats have moved from high in the software stack to progressively lower levels of the computational hierarchy, working their way towards the underlying hardware. Despite growing recognition of the issue, there are no common tools, methods, or solutions for chip-level security currently in wide use. This is largely driven by the economic hurdles and technical trade-offs often associated with secure chip design. Further, modern chip design methods are unforgiving – once a chip is designed, adding security after the fact or making changes to address newly discovered threats is nearly impossible.
The DARPA Nitride Electronics NeXt-Generation Technology (NEXT) program had the goal of developing a revolutionary GaN transistor technology to simultaneously achieve high-speed and large voltage swing. The expected outcome of the program was that highly-scaled GaN devices would ultimately benefit the design of efficient millimeter wave power amplifiers and mixed-signal circuits. The NEXT program was successful in developing GaN transistors with deeply scaled gate lengths along with modifications to the heteroepitaxial channel material, ohmic contacts, and overall gate structure, resulting in record performance for GaN devices.
New manufacturing technologies such as additive manufacturing have vastly improved the ability to create shapes and material properties previously thought impossible. Generating new designs that fully exploit these properties, however, has proven extremely challenging. Conventional design technologies, representations, and algorithms are inherently constrained by outdated presumptions about material properties and manufacturing methods. As a result, today’s design technologies are simply not able to bring to fruition the enormous level of physical detail and complexity made possible with cutting-edge manufacturing capabilities and materials.
Program Manager
Dr. Thomas E. Kazior joined DARPA in July 2020 as a program manager in the Microsystems Technology Office (MTO). His research interests include semiconductor device design, fabrication and integration processes including 3D heterogeneous integration (HI) of silicon and compound semiconductor and other non-silicon devices for RF arrays, and microwave/millimeter-wave/sub-millimeter-wave devices for sensors and communications.