Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Human-Machine Interface

Relating to the interaction between humans and machines

Showing 87 results for Interface RSS
01/08/2020
DARPA’s Subterranean (SubT) Challenge seeks to better equip warfighters and first responders to explore uncharted underground environments that are too dangerous, dark, or deep to risk human lives. In three circuit events and one final event, participating teams will deploy autonomous systems to attempt to map, navigate, and search various underground environments. Teams earn points by correctly identifying artifacts placed within those environments.
02/18/2020
Subterranean Challenge Urban Circuit - Feb 18: Team Move-in Day 1
01/01/1964

Douglas Engelbart of SRI invented the computer mouse as part of an ARPA-funded experiment to improve how humans interact with computers.

01/01/1962

DARPA’s Information Processing Techniques Office (IPTO) was born in 1962 and for nearly 50 years was responsible for DARPA’s information technology programs. IPTO invested in breakthrough technologies and seminal research projects that led to pathbreaking developments in computer hardware and software. Some of the most fundamental advances came in the areas of time-sharing, computer graphics, networking, advanced microprocessor design, parallel processing and artificial intelligence.

IPTO pursued an investment strategy in line with the vision of the office’s first director, J. C. R. Licklider. Licklider believed that humans would one day interact seamlessly with computers, which, in his words, “were not just superfast calculating machines, but joyful machines: tools that will serve as new media of expression, inspirations to creativity, and gateways to a vast world of online information." IPTO was combined with DARPA’s Transformational Convergence Technology Office (TCTO) in 2010 to form the Information Innovation Office (I2O).

01/01/1964

As part of an ARPA-funded experiment to find better ways for computer users to interact with computers, Douglas Engelbart of SRI—who would later work on the DARPA-sponsored ARPANET project, the Internet’s precursor—invented the computer mouse. The first mouse was carved out of wood and had just one button. Later incarnations such as this early Logitech® mouse led to the diversity of mice now on desktops around the world.

The mouse was an early example of many innovations that DARPA would help nurture into various components of the information technology landscape over the next five decades. In What Will Be (HarperCollins, 1997), author Michael Dertouzos credits DARPA with “… between a third and a half of all the major innovations in computer science and technology.”