Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Opportunities for Funding and/or Engagement

Relating to potential relationships with DARPA

Showing 7 results for Opportunities + SBIR RSS
07/07/2015
DARPA knows that the ideas leading to breakthrough technologies for national security often start small. To maximize the pool of innovative proposal concepts it receives, DARPA strongly encourages participation by all capable sources: industry, academia, and individuals.
04/29/2015
Traditional defense contractors, corporations and startups alike are critical parts of the innovation ecosystem in which DARPA operates and all of these--whether large and small-- can serve as performers of DARPA-funded R&D to generate revolutionary technologies and capabilities.
04/30/2015
DARPA knows that the ideas that lead to breakthrough technologies for national security often start small. To maximize the pool of innovative proposal concepts it receives, DARPA strongly encourages participation by non-traditional performers, including small businesses, academic and research institutions and first-time government contractors.
05/20/2015
The Technology Transition and Commercialization Team (T2C Team) administers the DARPA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)/Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Transition & Commercialization Support Program (TCSP). The TCSP is a voluntary participation program offered to DARPA-funded SBIR/STTR Phase II projects during the contract period of performance (typically 24 months). The goal is to increase the potential for these companies to move their developed technologies, solutions or products beyond Phase II and into the Department of Defense military Services, other federal agencies and/or the commercial market.
07/08/2015
Congress established the SBIR Program in 1982 to provide opportunities for small businesses to participate in Federal government-sponsored research and development (R&D). The goals of the SBIR Program are to: stimulate technological innovation; use small business to meet Federal R&D needs; foster and encourage participation by socially and economically disadvantaged small business concerns (SBCs), and by SBCs that are 51 percent owned and controlled by women, in technological innovation; and increase private sector commercialization of innovations derived from Federal R&D, thereby increasing competition, productivity and economic growth.