Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Adaptability

Showing 6 results for Adaptability + Spectrum RSS
02/26/2013
Phased radio frequency (RF) arrays use numerous small antennas to steer RF beams without mechanical movement (think radar without a spinning dish). These electronics are invaluable for critical DoD applications such as radar, communications and electronic warfare. Their lack of moving parts reduces maintenance requirements and their advanced electromagnetic capabilities, such as the ability to look in multiple directions at once, are extremely useful in the field. These benefits, though, come with a high price tag. Current phased arrays are extremely expensive and can take many years to engineer and build.
The Adaptive RF Technology (ART) program aims to significantly advance the hardware used in communication radios by developing a fully adaptive and reconfigurable architecture that is agnostic to specified waveforms and standards. ART-enabled “cognitive” radios would be able to reconfigure themselves to operate in any frequency band with any modulation and for multiple access specifications under a range of environmental and operating conditions.
Today’s electromagnetic (EM) systems use antenna arrays to provide unique capabilities, such as multiple beam forming and electronic steering, which are important for a wide variety of applications such as communications, signal intelligence (SIGINT), radar, and electronic warfare.
Program Manager
Dr. Roy (Troy) Olsson III joined DARPA as a program manager in June 2014. His research interests include materials, devices, and architectures that enable low-power processing of wireless and sensor signals, vanishing materials, electronics and structures, and phased array antennas.
Program Manager
Dr. Tom Rondeau joined DARPA as a program manager in the Microsystems Technology Office in May 2016. His research interests include adaptive and reconfigurable radios, improving the development cycle for new signal-processing techniques, and creating general purpose electromagnetic systems.