Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Technologies for Trustworthy Computing and Information

Confidence in the integrity of information and systems

Showing 8 results for Trust + Privacy RSS
It is easy to reverse engineer software today. An attacker generally requires no more than a basic debugger, a compiler and about a day's effort to de-obfuscate code that has been obfuscated with the best current methods. The reason for the relative ease is that program obfuscation is primarily based on "security through obscurity" strategies, typified by inserting passive junk code into a program’s source code. Existing program obfuscation methods also do not have quantifiable security models, and so it is difficult even to measure how much security is gained by a given obfuscation effort.
A zero-knowledge (ZK) proof is an interactive protocol between a prover and a verifier. The prover creates a statement that they want the verifier to accept, using knowledge that will remain hidden from the verifier. Recent research has substantially increased the efficiency of ZK proofs, enabling real-world use, primarily by cryptocurrencies. While useful for cryptocurrencies, the ZK proofs created are specialized for this task and do not necessarily scale for transactions that are more complex. For highly complex proof statements like those that the Department of Defense (DoD) may wish to employ, novel and more efficient approaches are needed.
09/20/2019
DARPA is soliciting innovative research proposals in the area of zero-knowledge proofs for complex, DoD-relevant capabilities. Proposed research should investigate innovative approaches that enable revolutionary advances in science, devices, or systems. Specifically excluded is research that primarily results in evolutionary improvements to the existing state of practice.