Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Technologies for Trustworthy Computing and Information

Confidence in the integrity of information and systems

Showing 7 results for Trust + Privacy RSS
01/16/2019
Whether a piece of information is private, proprietary, or sensitive to national security, systems owners and users have little guarantees about where their information resides or of its movements between systems. When a user enters information on a phone, for example, it is difficult to provably track that the data remains on the phone or whether it is uploaded to a server beyond the device. The national defense and security communities are similarly left with few options when it comes to ensuring that sensitive information is appropriately isolated, particularly when it’s loaded to an internet-connected system.
January 23, 2019,
DARPA Conference Center
The Information Innovation Office is holding a Proposers Day meeting to provide information to potential proposers on the objectives of the new Guaranteed Architecture for Physical Security (GAPS) program. GAPS will develop hardware and software architectures that can provide physically provable guarantees around high-risk transactions, or where data moves between systems of different security levels. DARPA wants to ensure that these transactions are isolated and that the systems they move across are enabled with the necessary data security assertions. The intended outputs of this program are hardware and software co-design tools that allow data separation requirements to be defined during design, and protections that can be physically enforced at system runtime.
Cloud computing provides computing capabilities as a service rather than a product. Advantages to this include reduced costs and maintenance, and increased flexibility, availability and scalability. Cloud computing, however, also presents some potentially significant security issues. In particular, vulnerabilities could include compromise of data security and loss of key information. Any computer or web-friendly device connected to the Internet could gain unauthorized access to pools of computing power, applications, or files – compromising information security in cloud-computing environments.
The Resilient Anonymous Communication for Everyone (RACE) program will research technologies for a distributed messaging system that can: a) exist completely within a given network, b) provide confidentiality, integrity, and availability of messaging, and c) preserve privacy to any participant in the system. Compromised system data and associated networked communications should not be helpful for compromising any additional parts of the system.
The goal of the Safer Warfighter Communications (SAFER) program is to develop technology that will enable safe, resilient communications over the Internet, particularly in situations in which a third-party is attempting to discover the identity or location of the end users, or block the communication. The technology developed through the program will also provide the quality of service (QoS) required to support applications such as instant messaging, electronic mail, social networking, streaming video, voice over Internet protocol (VoIP), video conferencing and other media that promote effective communication.