Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Analytics for Data at Massive Scales

Extracting information from large data sets

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The U.S. Government operates globally and frequently encounters so-called “low-resource” languages for which no automated human language technology capability exists. Historically, development of technology for automated exploitation of foreign language materials has required protracted effort and a large data investment. Current methods can require multiple years and tens of millions of dollars per language—mostly to construct translated or transcribed corpora.
Whereas the tools and weapons that are used by our warfighters have evolved dramatically in the past few decades, the way in which the warfighter is prepared has not kept pace with those developments. The Measuring Biological Aptitude (MBA) program aims to address the need for a more capable fighting force by helping individual warfighters identify, measure, and track personalized biomarkers related to training and peak performance for specialized roles. If the program succeeds, MBA technologies will give warfighters the ability to understand the underlying biological processes that govern their performance.
Historically, the U.S. Government deployed and operated a variety of collection systems that provided imagery with assured integrity. In recent years however, consumer imaging technology (digital cameras, mobile phones, etc.) has become ubiquitous, allowing people the world over to take and share images and video instantaneously.
The goal of the Modeling Adversarial Activity (MAA) program is to develop mathematical and computational techniques for modeling adversarial activity for the purpose of producing high-confidence indications and warnings of efforts to acquire, fabricate, proliferate, and/or deploy weapons of mass terror (WMTs). MAA assumes that an adversary’s WMT activities will result in observable transactions.
Warfighters encounter foreign language images in many forms, including captured paper documents and computer files. Given the quantity of foreign-language material and the scarcity of linguists, military personnel and analysts can find it difficult to identify, translate and interpret important information in a timely fashion. What these personnel and analysts have lacked to date is the capability to automatically and rapidly convert foreign-language text images into English transcripts that provide relevant, distilled and actionable information.