Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Analytics for Data at Massive Scales

Extracting information from large data sets

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The goal of the Modeling Adversarial Activity (MAA) program is to develop mathematical and computational techniques for modeling adversarial activity for the purpose of producing high-confidence indications and warnings of efforts to acquire, fabricate, proliferate, and/or deploy weapons of mass terror (WMTs). MAA assumes that an adversary’s WMT activities will result in observable transactions.
Warfighters encounter foreign language images in many forms, including captured paper documents and computer files. Given the quantity of foreign-language material and the scarcity of linguists, military personnel and analysts can find it difficult to identify, translate and interpret important information in a timely fashion. What these personnel and analysts have lacked to date is the capability to automatically and rapidly convert foreign-language text images into English transcripts that provide relevant, distilled and actionable information.
DARPA's Oceans of Things program seeks to enable persistent maritime situational awareness over large ocean areas by deploying thousands of small, low-cost floats that could form a distributed sensor network. Each smart float would contain a suite of commercially available sensors to collect environmental data-such as ocean temperature, sea state, and location-as well as activity data about commercial vessels, aircraft, and even maritime mammals moving through the area. The floats would transmit data periodically via satellite to a cloud network for storage and real-time analysis.
The Physics of Artificial Intelligence (PAI) program is part of a broad DAPRA initiative to develop and apply “Third Wave” AI technologies to sparse data and adversarial spoofing, and that incorporate domain-relevant knowledge through generative contextual and explanatory models.
From phony news on Web sites to terrorist propaganda on social media to recruitment videos posted by extremists, conflict in the information domain is becoming a ubiquitous addition to traditional battlespaces. Given the pace of growth in social media and other networked communications, this bustling domain of words and images—once relegated to the sidelines of strategic planning—is poised to become ever more critical to national security and military success around the globe.