Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Artificial Intelligence and Human-Computer Symbiosis Technologies

Technology to facilitate more intuitive interactions between humans and machines

Showing 32 results for Artificial Intelligence + Autonomy RSS
May 17, 2019 ,
DARPA Conference Center
The Strategic Technology Office is holding a Proposers Day meeting to provide information to potential proposers on the objectives of the new Air Combat Evolution (ACE) program and to facilitate teaming. The goal of ACE is to automate air-to-air combat, enabling reaction times at machine speeds and freeing pilots to concentrate on the larger air battle. Turning aerial dogfighting over to AI is less about dogfighting, which should be rare in the future, and more about giving pilots the confidence that AI and automation can handle a high-end fight.
March 5, 2019,
Executive Conference Center
The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) is sponsoring a Proposers Day to provide information to potential proposers on the objectives of an anticipated Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) for the Science of Artificial Intelligence and Learning for Open-world Novelty (SAIL-ON) program.
Efficient discovery and production of new molecules is essential to realize capabilities across the DoD, from simulants and medicines essential to counter emerging threats, to coatings, dyes and specialty fuels needed for advanced performance.
The United States Government has an interest in developing and maintaining a strategic understanding of events, situations, and trends around the world, in a variety of domains. The information used in developing this understanding comes from many disparate sources, in a variety of genres, and data types, and as a mixture of structured and unstructured data. Unstructured data can include text or speech in English and a variety of other languages, as well as images, videos, and other sensor information.
Humans intuitively combine pre-existing knowledge with observations and contextual clues to construct rich mental models of the world around them and use these models to evaluate goals, perform thought experiments, make predictions, and update their situational understanding. When the environment contains other people, humans use a skill called theory of mind (ToM) to infer their mental states from observed actions and context, and predict future actions from those inferred states.