Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Harness Biological Systems

Leveraging genetic technologies to engineer synthetic or natural organisms

Showing 52 results for Bio-systems RSS
June 13, 2018,
Westin Arlington Gateway Hotel
DARPA’s Biological Technologies Office is hosting a Proposers Day meeting to provide information to potential applicants on the structure and objectives of the new PReemptive Expression of Protective Alleles and Response Elements (PREPARE) program. PREPARE will explore ways to better protect against biological, chemical, or radiological threats by temporarily and reversibly tuning gene expression to bolster the body’s defenses against—or directly neutralize—a given threat. It will focus on four key health challenges as proofs of concept: influenza viral infection, opioid overdose, organophosphate poisoning, and exposure to gamma radiation.
February 21, 2017 ,
Webcast
The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) is sponsoring a Proposers Day to provide information to potential proposers on the objectives of a Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) for the RadioBio program.
September 30, 2016,
United States Institute of Peace
DARPA’s Biological Technologies Office (BTO) is hosting a Proposers Day to provide information to potential proposers on the objectives of the upcoming Safe Genes program. The program aims to help unlock the potential of advanced gene editing technologies by developing a set of biosafety and biosecurity tools to address potential risks of this rapidly advancing field.
August 29, 2017,
Webcast
The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) is sponsoring a Proposers Day webcast to provide information to potential proposers on the objectives of an anticipated Research Announcement (RA) for the Young Faculty Award (YFA) program.
The Advanced Plant Technologies (APT) program seeks to develop plants capable of serving as next-generation, persistent, ground-based sensor technologies to protect deployed troops and the homeland by detecting and reporting on chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive (CBRNE) threats. Such biological sensors would be effectively energy-independent, increasing their potential for wide distribution, while reducing risks associated with deployment and maintenance of traditional sensors. These technologies could also potentially support humanitarian operations by, for example, detecting unexploded ordnance in post-conflict settings.