Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Thermal Management

Materials, designs and systems to manage and disperse heat and improve technology effectiveness

Showing 5 results for Thermal + Manufacturing RSS
04/30/2013
Many military radio frequency (RF) systems, like radar and communication systems, use a class of power amplifiers (PAs) called monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MIMIC). MMIC PAs using gallium nitride (GaN) transistors hold great promise for enhanced RF performance, but operational characteristics are strongly affected by thermal resistance. Much of this resistance comes at the thermal junction where the substrate material of the circuit connects to the GaN transistor. If the junction and substrate have poor thermal properties, temperature will rise and performance will decrease.
12/17/2018
Hypersonic vehicles fly through the atmosphere at incredibly high speeds, creating intense friction with the surrounding air as they travel at Mach 5 or above – five times faster than sound travels. Developing structures that can withstand furnace-like temperatures at such high speeds is a technical challenge, especially for leading edges that bear the brunt of the heat.
January 22, 2019,
Executive Conference Center
The Defense Sciences Office is holding a Proposers Day meeting and webcast to provide information to potential proposers on the objectives of the new Materials Architectures and Characterization for Hypersonics (MACH) program. MACH seeks to develop new materials and designs for cooling the hot leading edges of hypersonic vehicles traveling more than five times the speed of sound.
The Materials Architectures and Characterization for Hypersonics (MACH) program aims to develop and demonstrate new materials architectures for sharp, shape-stable, cooled leading edges for hypersonic vehicles. The program will investigate innovative approaches that enable revolutionary advances in the materials, design and implementation of shape-stable, high heat flux capable leading edge systems.
Significant enhancements in fundamental device materials, technologies and system integration have led to rapid increases in the total power consumption of DoD systems. In many cases, power consumption has increased while system size has decreased, leading to an even greater problem with heat density. Thermal management of DoD systems often imposes the main obstacle to further enhancements.