Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Prevention and Therapy

Biomedical technologies designed to thwart initial infection or injury, or enable faster healing afterward

Showing 54 results for Therapy RSS
The Surviving Blood Loss (SBL) program is developing novel strategies to radically extend the time injured warfighters can survive critical blood loss on the battlefield before initiation of fluid and blood resuscitation. Achieving this goal will allow increased time—as much as hours or days—for evacuation, triage, and initiation of supportive therapies.
The Systems-Based Neurotechnology for Emerging Therapies (SUBNETS) program aims to improve force health by using neurotechnology as the basis for effective, informed, and precise treatments for neuropsychiatric illnesses in military Service members. The effects of such illnesses, brought on by war, traumatic injuries, and other experiences, remain challenging to treat. Current treatment approaches—surgery, medications, and psychotherapy—can often help to alleviate the worst effects of illnesses such as major depression and post-traumatic stress, but they are imprecise and not universally effective. Through SUBNETS, DARPA seeks to generate the knowledge and technology required to deliver relief to patients with otherwise intractable neuropsychiatric illness.
The Technologies for Host Resilience (THoR) Program aims to develop new methods to maintain and optimize force health in the face of new and emerging infectious diseases. The goal is to discover the molecular mechanisms for tolerance of infection in animals, and develop therapeutic strategies that modulate the resilience of humans against infection. This capability would support military readiness by enabling warfighters to weather the storm of infectious diseases in low-resource or remote settings where pathogen-specific therapeutics or intensive care unit capabilities may not be locally available.
Uncontrolled blood loss is the leading cause of death for warfighters on the battlefield, according to the U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research. The vast majority of such fatalities are from wounds that are not accessible by combat medics for traditional treatments, like direct compression. For example, in the case of internal injuries to the abdominal cavity, medics can neither visualize the damage nor access it to provide treatment. As a result, rapid and uncontrolled blood loss often leads to death before transport from the battlefield to a surgical setting can occur.
Program Manager
Dr. Amy Jenkins joined DARPA as a program manager in the Biological Technologies Office (BTO) in June 2019. Her interests include the development of platforms for combatting infectious disease threats as well as novel manufacturing methods to enable rapid response.