Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Fundamental Physical Science

Pushing the boundaries of knowledge of the physical sciences

Showing 110 results for Fundamentals RSS
ITA3 will determine the practical and fundamental limits to imaging using low frequency electromagnetic waves.
The photon is a fundamental carrier of information, possessing numerous information carrying degrees of freedom including frequency, phase, arrival time, polarization, orbital angular momentum, linear momentum, entanglement, etc. Because optical photons are approximately a million times more costly (i.e., energetic) than their radio frequency counterparts, photons are a valuable resource for many military applications ranging from communications systems to visible and infrared sensing platforms.
Coatings, thin films and advanced surfaces are important aspects of systems, devices and technologies critical to the mission of the Department of Defense. Despite decades of work, methods that enable atomic through millimeter-scale control over structure and properties of materials deposited on surfaces are still underdeveloped. For example, structural organization of high-value thin films is typically controlled by high-temperature deposition or annealing, but the temperatures employed during thin-film synthesis and deposition exceed the limits of many DoD-relevant substrates, restricting application opportunities.
Synthetic chemistry is important across countless technological areas, from medicines to energetics to advanced coatings to functional materials. While our synthetic capabilities have developed rapidly over the last century, current approaches are still slow and inefficient, with poor reproducibility and scalability and limited use of prior knowledge. Such an approach not only limits production of known materials, but also impedes discovery of better synthetic routes and completely new molecules.
The Mesodynamic Architectures (Meso) program seeks to address future Defense needs by exploiting unique characteristics of matter and energy emerging at small spatial and short temporal scales including new states of matter, untapped forces, novel relationships between fields and excitations and the importance of noise and nonlinearity. The parallel goals of the Meso program are to provide DoD with unrivaled communication, sensing, and computation by exploiting mesoscale characteristics, while establishing well-defined problems to accelerate the transition to quantum engineering.