Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Restoration of Function

Biological, prosthetic and other technologies designed to provide function equivalent to function lost due to disease or injury

Showing 6 results for Restoration + Therapy RSS
03/05/2014
With an eye on the urgent need to develop breakthrough technologies for national security, the President’s requested budget of $2.915 billion in Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) would allow the agency to pursue promising new ideas and help to restore some of the reductions in the agency’s budget from prior years.
11/06/2014
Many businesses and academic researchers wishing to pursue cutting-edge research ideas with government support lack the resources to navigate the burdensome paperwork requirements required to win federal grants or contracts. DARPA’s Biological Technologies Office (BTO) has created a simplified proposal process to attract and fund new ideas from just those types of innovators—those operating at the intersection of biology and technology who may never have worked with the Defense Department and may otherwise have remained too daunted to try.
10/26/2016
Pressure—the physical quantity of an experience of touch—is a fundamental dimension of human perception, conveying to the brain not just that the skin is in contact with something, but also how intense the contact is. That awareness is what enables people to, for instance, gently but securely handle an egg without squeezing so hard that the shell cracks.
With a focus on wounded warriors and facilitating their return to military service, the Hand Proprioception and Touch Interfaces (HAPTIX) program is pursuing key technologies to enable precision control of and sensory feedback from sensor-equipped upper-limb prosthetic devices. If successful, the resulting system would provide users near-natural control of prosthetic hands and arms via bi-directional peripheral nerve implants. The program has a strong focus on technology handoff and aims to create and transition clinically relevant technology in support of wounded warriors suffering from single or multiple limb loss.
The Reliable Central-Nervous-System (CNS) Interfaces (RCI) effort seeks to demonstrate CNS interfaces that dramatically extend their performance and lifetime. RCI includes strategies for reliably recording motor-control information from a variety of sources, such as single-unit action potentials, local field potentials, electrocorticography (ECoG) and electroencephalography (EEG). This effort focuses on developing amputee-relevant behavioral-testing methods to accurately evaluate the reliability of CNS-interface systems prior to testing in the intended patient population.