Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Restoration of Function

Biological, prosthetic and other technologies designed to provide function equivalent to function lost due to disease or injury

Showing 36 results for Restoration RSS
The Restoring Active Memory (RAM) program aims to mitigate the effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in military Service members by developing neurotechnologies to facilitate memory formation and recall in the injured brain. More than 270,000 Service members have been diagnosed with TBI since 2000. The condition frequently results in an impaired ability to retrieve memories formed prior to injury and a reduced capacity to form or retain new memories following injury. Despite the scale of the problem, few effective therapies currently exist to mitigate the long-term consequences of TBI on memory. Enabling restoration of memory function would support military readiness by providing injured personnel the option of returning to duty, and would improve quality of life for wounded veterans.
Thanks to improvements in body armor and combat casualty care, military Service members are now surviving severe battlefield injuries that involve traumatic limb amputation. However, because these survivors are predominantly young, they must live with their injuries for decades. This severely diminishes affected individuals’ quality of life and places a massive responsibility on the military's medical and rehabilitation system.
The Tactical Undersea Network Architectures (TUNA) program seeks to develop and demonstrate novel optical-fiber-based technology options and designs to temporarily restore tactical data network connectivity in a contested environment. TUNA is currently in an initial phase that emphasizes concept and technology development in three technical areas: system design, small fiber optic cable systems, and buoy nodes.
03/08/2016
The Histology for Interface Stability over Time (HIST) effort identifies leading mechanisms of interface degradation and failure. HIST teams are also developing new invasive and non-invasive histology methods to assess neural-recording-interface status and performance, accurate predictive models of interface performance, and methods to reduce the time required to assess and develop robust interfaces.
03/08/2016
The Reliable Central-Nervous-System (CNS) Interfaces (RCI) effort seeks to demonstrate CNS interfaces that dramatically extend their performance and lifetime. RCI includes strategies for reliably recording motor-control information from a variety of sources, such as single-unit action potentials, local field potentials, electrocorticography (ECoG) and electroencephalography (EEG). This effort focuses on developing amputee-relevant behavioral-testing methods to accurately evaluate the reliability of CNS-interface systems prior to testing in the intended patient population.