Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Information or Signal Processing

Computational tools and techiques for manipulating, analyzing, and synthesizing signals and data

Showing 8 results for Processing + Cyber RSS
05/18/2015
The mission of the Information Innovation Office (I2O) is to ensure enduring advantage for the U.S. and its allies across a broad range of information technologies through the advancement of core technical foundations as well as the design of novel application concepts based on these foundations. I2O’s core technical work ranges from artificial intelligence and data analysis to secure engineering and formal methods.
The mission of the Information Innovation Office (I2O) is to ensure enduring advantage for the U.S. and its allies across a broad range of information technologies through the advancement of core technical foundations as well as the design of novel application concepts based on these foundations. I2O’s core technical work ranges from artificial intelligence and data analysis to secure engineering and formal methods.
June 30, 2016,
DARPA Conference Center
DARPA’s Information Innovation Office (I2O) is hosting a Proposers Day to provide information to potential proposers on the objectives of the upcoming Dispersed Computing program. The program will seek to develop scalable, robust decision systems that enable secure, collective tasking of computing assets in a mission-aware fashion by users with competing demands, and across large numbers of heterogeneous computing platforms. These systems must be able to operate in environments where network connectivity is highly variable and degraded.
August 24, 2018, 8:00 AM ET,
DARPA Conference Center
DARPA’s Information Innovation Office is hosting a Proposers Day to provide information to potential applicants on the structure and objectives of the Searchlight program. The goal of Searchlight is to develop novel approaches to analysis and Quality of Service management of an enterprise’s distributed applications overlaid on the public Internet. Proposed approaches must reflect priorities while minimizing impacts on other applications.
In the current art, users with significant computing requirements have typically depended on access to large, highly shared data centers to which they backhaul their data (e.g., images, video, or network log files) for processing. However, in many operational scenarios, the cost and latency of this backhaul can be problematic, especially when network throughput is severely limited or when the user application requires a near real-time response. In such cases, users’ ability to leverage computing power that is available “locally” (in the sense of latency, available throughput, or similar measures that are relevant to the user or mission) could substantially improve application performance while reducing mission risk.