Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Information or Signal Processing

Computational tools and techiques for manipulating, analyzing, and synthesizing signals and data

Showing 55 results for Processing RSS
Computational capability is an enabler for nearly every military system, but increases in this capability are limited by available system power and constraints on the ability to dissipate heat. This is a challenge for embedded applications such as soldier-borne applications, UAVs and command and control systems on submarines. Today’s intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) systems have sensors that collect far more information than they can process in real time; as a result, what could be invaluable real-time intelligence data in the hands of our warfighters is simply discarded, or perhaps recorded and processed hours or days after it was collected.
Real-time assessment of the electromagnetic environment can provide a key tactical advantage. The rapid development and proliferation of advanced radios, however, has made this a challenging task. Radio frequency (RF) sensor systems on the modern battlefield must cover many RF and microwave bands through noise and powerful interferers. Ultra-wideband analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) has emerged as an essential technology to interface between propagating analog RF signals and digital processing for reactive decision-making. Such an ADC allows for high-speed and reconfigurable digital processing in a complex electromagnetic environment.
SDR and software development kits (SDK) such as GNU Radio exist as free and open source technologies that are widely used in research, industry, academia, government, and hobbyist environments to support both wireless communications research and real-world radio systems. However, even with high end multi-core x86 central processing units (CPU) there are adaptive radar, electronic warfare (EW), and communications applications that cannot be implemented onto SDR with a purely homogeneous CPU due to high latency and power consumption.
For decades, miniaturizing electronics has been key to a wide array of technology innovations and an important economic driver. As an example, the seemingly endless shrinking of the transistor has allowed the semiconductor industry to place ever more devices on the same amount of silicon. Each time the size decreased, transistors became faster and used less power, allowing increasingly capable electronics in smaller packages at reduced cost.
The Department of Defense (DoD) often leverages social and behavioral science (SBS) research to design plans, guide investments, assess outcomes, and build models of human social systems and behaviors as they relate to national security challenges in the human domain. However, a number of recent empirical studies and meta-analyses have revealed that many SBS results vary dramatically in terms of their ability to be independently reproduced or replicated, which could have real-world implications for DoD’s plans, decisions, and models. To help address this situation, DARPA’s Systematizing Confidence in Open Research and Evidence (SCORE) program aims to develop and deploy automated tools to assign "confidence scores" to different SBS research results and claims.