Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Position, Navigation and Timing

Technologies relating to precision geolocation, time-keeping and synchronization

Showing 13 results for PNT + Sensors RSS
The military relies heavily on the Global Positioning System (GPS) for positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT), but GPS access is easily blocked by methods such as jamming. In addition, many environments in which our military operates (inside buildings, in urban canyons, under dense foliage, underwater, and underground) have limited or no GPS access. To solve this challenge, Adaptable Navigation Systems (ANS) seeks to provide GPS-quality PNT to military users regardless of the operational environment.
DARPA's Angler program seeks to develop undersea autonomous robotic solutions capable of navigating ocean depths, surveying wide areas, and physically manipulating manmade objects of interest on the sea floor. The program builds on the agency's previous advances in autonomous robotic manipulation on Earth and in space, and aims to process mission commands, sensor inputs, and information about the deep ocean environment to complete tasks with no human intervention.
For decades, Global Positioning System (GPS) technology has been incorporated into vehicles and munitions to meet DoD requirements for precision guidance and navigation. GPS dependence creates a critical vulnerability for many DoD systems in situations where the GPS signal is degraded or unavailable.
The Chip-Scale Atomic Clock (CSAC) effort created ultra-miniaturized, low-power, atomic time and frequency reference units. The development of CSAC enabled ultra-miniaturized and ultra-low power atomic clocks for high-security Ultra High Frequency (UHF) communication and jam-resistant GPS receivers. The use of CSAC technology can greatly improve the mobility and robustness of any military system or platform with sophisticated UHF communication and/or navigation requirements.
The Microscale Rate Integrating Gyroscope (MRIG) effort seeks to create micromachined vibratory gyroscopes that can be instrumented to directly measure the angle of rotation, extending the dynamic range and eliminating the need to integrate angular rate information. If successful, MRIG will enable high performance, low cost gyroscopes which, when integrated in Inertial Measurement Units (IMU), will be small enough for adaptation in guided munitions’ platforms, hand-held devices, and add-in portable Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) units.