Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Photonics, Optics and Lasers

Science and technology dealing with the transmission and manipulation of light

Showing 5 results for Photonics + Manufacturing RSS
11/21/2019
Lasers are essential to many fields – ranging from optical communications and remote sensing, to manufacturing and medicine. While the semiconductor laser was first demonstrated nearly 60 years ago, advances in diode lasers and access to semiconductor fabrication techniques have enabled continued innovation and miniaturization of the technology. Photonic integrated circuits (PICs), which combine many photonic elements onto a single chip, have also transformed the way lasers and other optical systems are engineered, creating improvements in size, weight, and power (SWaP), system performance, and enabling new functionality. Despite these advances, a number of obstacles still hamper the proliferation of optical systems for defense and commercial applications.
August 13, 2019, 9:00 AM ET,
Executive Conference Center
The Microsystems Technology Office is holding a Proposers Day meeting to provide information to potential proposers on the objectives of the new FOcal arrays for Curved Infrared Imagers (FOCII) program and to facilitate teaming. The goal of the program is to develop and demonstrate technologies for curving existing state-of-the-art, large-format, high-performance infrared focal plane arrays (FPAs) to a small radius of curvature (ROC) to maximize performance, as well as curve smaller format FPAs to an extreme ROC to enable the smallest form factors possible while maintaining exquisite performance.
November 20, 2019, 8:00 AM EST,
Executive Conference Center
The Microsystems Technology Office is holding a Proposers Day meeting covering the new Lasers for Universal Microscale Optical Systems (LUMOS) program. The goal of LUMOS is to transform optical microsystems through the co-integration of direct-emission materials, such as InP, GaN, and GaAs, with low-loss dielectric materials such as silicon and silicon nitride to create accessible, manufacturable systems. LUMOS also seeks to leverage new concepts in nanophotonic structures, non-reciprocity, and nonlinear processes, as well as alternative materials that possess strong electro-optic and novel properties, such as thin-film lithium niobate, III-nitrides, and other advanced compounds that enable new component functionality. Finally, LUMOS seeks to illustrate the benefits of complete component integration by pursuing DoD-relevant system demonstrations with compelling gains in performance and significant size, weight, and power (SWaP) advantages over current state-of-the-art solutions.
09/11/2017
Contact DSO Program Managers to discuss your ideas.
09/11/2017
Although available program funds are typically fully allocated at the start of a program, opportunities sometimes arise 12 – 18 months after program kickoff, when phase 1 performance is being assessed. If you have ideas you think may be of interest to a program, this may be a good time to talk to the PM.