Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Photonics, Optics and Lasers

Science and technology dealing with the transmission and manipulation of light

Showing 69 results for Photonics RSS
November 1, 2018, 8:30 AM ET,
DARPA Conference Center
The Microsystems Technology Office is holding a Proposers Day to provide information to potential proposers on the objectives of the new program. PIPES will develop optical I/O for emerging data movement needs of commercial and military systems. PIPES seeks to emplace integrated optical transceiver capabilities into cutting-edge multi-chip modules (e.g., field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), graphical processing units (GPUs), central processing units (CPUs), and application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs)) for 2023-era microelectronics with performance well beyond currently available solutions. In parallel, PIPES aims to develop novel optical I/O approaches and advanced optical packaging and switching technologies to satisfy data movement demands of highly parallel systems in the 2028 timeframe. Additionally, the program will combine the advanced microelectronics capabilities of commercial industry, innovative photonics solutions from research communities, and DoD-specific application drivers from the defense industry into a framework for long-term technology availability by establishing and supporting a domestic technology ecosystem.
December 17, 2015,
DARPA Conference Center
The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Microsystems Technology Office (MTO) is hosting a Proposers Day to provide information to potential proposers on the objectives that will be specified in an anticipated Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) of the Modular Optical Apertures Building Blocks (MOABB) program. The MOAB program aims to develop advanced technologies that could catalyze the creation of ultracompact light detection and ranging (LIDAR) systems.
The goal of All Together Now (ATN) is to develop theoretical protocols and experimental techniques that enable new collective atom regimes, leading to sensitivities approaching the ultimate fundamental limits of performance.
Radio Frequency and mixed signal electronics face performance limitations due to the limited circuit complexity possible in typical high-speed/high-dynamic-range compound semiconductor integrated circuit technologies. By integrating these high-performance electronics with deep submicron silicon complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (Si CMOS) technology, designers can exploit the ultra large scale integration density of Si CMOS to combine complex signal processing and self-correction architectures with the highest performance compound semiconductor electronics, thus achieving unprecedented levels of performance (e.g. bandwidth, dynamic range, power consumption).
High performance optoelectronic systems, e.g. ultra low-noise lasers and optoelectronic signal sources, are employed in numerous applications such as fiber optic communications, high-precision timing references, LADAR, imaging arrays, etc. Current state-of-the-art ultra-low noise lasers and optoelectronic signal sources use macro-scale photonics for mechanical and thermal noise suppression, and off-chip electronics for feedback control. The benchtop or rack mount component-level assembly of these sources limits photonic coupling efficiency as well as the speed of electronic feedback, and also adds size and weight to the system. Integration of these components in a chip-scale form factor could greatly mitigate these limitations.