Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Neuroscience

Relating to the central and peripheral nervous system, including the brain

Showing 64 results for Neuroscience RSS
The Reorganization and Plasticity to Accelerate Injury Recovery (REPAIR) program aims to uncover the mechanisms underlying neural computation and reorganization to improve modeling of the brain and our ability to interface with it.
The Restoring Active Memory (RAM) program aims to mitigate the effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in military Service members by developing neurotechnologies to facilitate memory formation and recall in the injured brain. More than 270,000 Service members have been diagnosed with TBI since 20001. The condition frequently results in an impaired ability to retrieve memories formed prior to injury and a reduced capacity to form or retain new memories following injury. Despite the scale of the problem, few effective therapies currently exist to mitigate the long-term consequences of TBI on memory. Enabling restoration of memory function would support military readiness by providing injured personnel the option of returning to duty, and would improve quality of life for wounded veterans.
Thanks to improvements in body armor and combat casualty care, military Service members are now surviving severe battlefield injuries that involve traumatic limb amputation. However, because these survivors are predominantly young, they must live with their injuries for decades. This severely diminishes affected individuals’ quality of life and places a massive responsibility on the military's medical and rehabilitation system.
In contemporary military operations, servicemembers are called on to act as street-level diplomats, negotiators, peacekeepers, law enforcement officers and relief workers. Because their military training, however, focuses primarily on kinetic operations, many servicemembers, especially those junior in age and experience, find these roles unfamiliar and challenging. Most existing training for non-kinetic operations is limited in time and scope and typically emphasizes general familiarization with language and culture, rather than building fundamental skills that enable such specific knowledge to be implemented successfully. While some highly effective military training programs focus on enhancing servicemembers’ capacity to function in non-kinetic social encounters, they tend to be extremely costly and manpower intensive.
The Systems-Based Neurotechnology for Emerging Therapies (SUBNETS) program aims to improve force health by using neurotechnology as the basis for effective, informed, and precise treatments for neuropsychiatric illnesses in military Service members. The effects of such illnesses, brought on by war, traumatic injuries, and other experiences, remain challenging to treat. Current treatment approaches—surgery, medications, and psychotherapy—can often help to alleviate the worst effects of illnesses such as major depression and post-traumatic stress, but they are imprecise and not universally effective. Through SUBNETS, DARPA seeks to generate the knowledge and technology required to deliver relief to patients with otherwise intractable neuropsychiatric illness.