Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Neuroscience

Relating to the central and peripheral nervous system, including the brain

Showing 67 results for Neuroscience RSS
The Reliable Central-Nervous-System (CNS) Interfaces (RCI) effort seeks to demonstrate CNS interfaces that dramatically extend their performance and lifetime. RCI includes strategies for reliably recording motor-control information from a variety of sources, such as single-unit action potentials, local field potentials, electrocorticography (ECoG) and electroencephalography (EEG). This effort focuses on developing amputee-relevant behavioral-testing methods to accurately evaluate the reliability of CNS-interface systems prior to testing in the intended patient population.
The Reliable Peripheral Interfaces (RPI) effort seeks to demonstrate peripheral-nervous-system (PNS) interfaces that can reliably extract motor-control information for intuitive control of high-performance upper-limb prosthetics. This effort includes a variety of PNS-interface approaches such as nerve cuffs, penetrating electrode arrays, regenerative interfaces, tissue-engineered biological constructs, non-penetrating devices, invasive electromyography (EMG) and sensory-input (stimulation) systems.
The Reorganization and Plasticity to Accelerate Injury Recovery (REPAIR) program aims to uncover the mechanisms underlying neural computation and reorganization to improve modeling of the brain and our ability to interface with it.
The Restoring Active Memory (RAM) program aims to mitigate the effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in military Service members by developing neurotechnologies to facilitate memory formation and recall in the injured brain. More than 270,000 Service members have been diagnosed with TBI since 20001. The condition frequently results in an impaired ability to retrieve memories formed prior to injury and a reduced capacity to form or retain new memories following injury. Despite the scale of the problem, few effective therapies currently exist to mitigate the long-term consequences of TBI on memory. Enabling restoration of memory function would support military readiness by providing injured personnel the option of returning to duty, and would improve quality of life for wounded veterans.
Thanks to improvements in body armor and combat casualty care, military Service members are now surviving severe battlefield injuries that involve traumatic limb amputation. However, because these survivors are predominantly young, they must live with their injuries for decades. This severely diminishes affected individuals’ quality of life and places a massive responsibility on the military's medical and rehabilitation system.