Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Network Technology

Relating to nodes in a connected architecture

Showing 27 results for Networking + Programs RSS
Radios are used for a wide range of tasks, from the most mundane to the most critical of communications, from garage door openers to military operations. As the use of wireless technology proliferates, radios and communication devices often interfere with and disrupt other wireless devices. First responder radios need to be able to communicate reliably in such congested and contested environments and to share radio spectrum without direct coordination or spectrum preplanning.
Modern military engagements increasingly take place in complex and uncertain battlefield conditions where attacks can come from multiple directions at once, and in the electromagnetic spectrum and cyber domains, as well. U.S. Army and U.S. Marine Corps dismounted infantry squads have been unable to take full advantage of some highly effective multi-domain defensive and offensive capabilities that vehicle-assigned forces currently enjoy -- in large part because many of the relevant technologies are too heavy and cumbersome for individual warfighters to carry or too difficult to use under demanding field conditions.
System F6 seeks to demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of a satellite architecture wherein the functionality of a traditional “monolithic” spacecraft is delivered by a cluster of wirelessly-interconnected modules capable of sharing their resources and utilizing resources found elsewhere in the cluster. Such architecture enhances the adaptability and survivability of space systems, while shortening development timelines and reducing the barrier-to-entry for participation in the national security space industry.
The Tactical Undersea Network Architectures (TUNA) program seeks to develop and demonstrate novel optical-fiber-based technology options and designs to temporarily restore tactical data network connectivity in a contested environment. TUNA is currently in an initial phase that emphasizes concept and technology development in three technical areas: system design, small fiber optic cable systems, and buoy nodes.
The undersea domain imposes well-known limits on communication and therefore the capacity to transfer the right information necessary to its intended purpose. The TIMEly program aims to develop concepts for a heterogeneous underwater network architecture that enables the vision of mosaic warfare by the contemporaneous composition of effect chains from available assets in any domain, but with an emphasis on the underwater domain in order to provide options for execution on the fly.