Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Network Technology

Relating to nodes in a connected architecture

Showing 10 results for Networking + Processing RSS
In the current art, users with significant computing requirements have typically depended on access to large, highly shared data centers to which they backhaul their data (e.g., images, video, or network log files) for processing. However, in many operational scenarios, the cost and latency of this backhaul can be problematic, especially when network throughput is severely limited or when the user application requires a near real-time response. In such cases, users’ ability to leverage computing power that is available “locally” (in the sense of latency, available throughput, or similar measures that are relevant to the user or mission) could substantially improve application performance while reducing mission risk.
Today’s network subsystems are a major performance bottleneck on the paths that interconnect multiprocessor servers. In comparison with processing speeds, parallelization, and storage speed-ups, the capacity of network links has relatively worsened over time, and to a dramatic extent. This bottleneck has remained unaddressed due to commercial incentives focused on incremental technology advances across multiple, independent market siloes in network and server technology. This has made network interface cards (NICs), which bridge the network/server boundary, an afterthought in both technology marketplaces.
Office Director
Dr. William Scherlis assumed the role of office director for DARPA’s Information Innovation Office (I2O) in September 2019. In this role he leads program managers in the development of programs, technologies, and capabilities to ensure information advantage for the United States and its allies, and coordinates this work across the Department of Defense and U.S. government.
05/13/2020
I2O Thrust Areas
08/30/2020
This Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) seeks revolutionary research ideas for topics not being addressed by ongoing I2O programs or other published solicitations. Potential proposers are highly encouraged to review the current I2O programs (http://www.darpa.mil/about-us/offices/i2o) and solicitations (http://www.darpa.mil/work-with-us/opportunities) to avoid proposing efforts that duplicate existing activities or that are responsive to other published I2O solicitations.