Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Mobile Technology

Technologies and advances that facilitate wireless, ubiquitous transmission, including miniaturization

Showing 35 results for Mobile RSS
12/14/2017
The DARPA Bay Area Software Defined Radio (SDR) Hackfest came to a close on Friday, November 17 at the NASA Ames Conference Center in Moffett Field, CA. During the weeklong event, over 150 members of the SDR community came together to discuss, innovate, and ideate around the future of software radio technology and its potential to address challenging communications issues that are emerging due to the increasingly congested electromagnetic (EM) spectrum and the proliferation of wireless-enabled devices.
01/24/2018
There is increasing interest in making broader use of the millimeter wave frequency band for communications on small mobile platforms where narrow antenna beams from small radiating apertures provide enhanced communication security. Today’s millimeter wave systems, however, are not user friendly and are designed to be platform specific, lacking interoperability and are thus reserved for only the most complex platforms. To expand the use of millimeter wave phased-arrays and make them broadly applicable across DoD systems, many technical challenges must be addressed, including wideband frequency coverage, precision beam pointing, user discover and mesh networking.
02/05/2020
Emerging 5G mobile wireless networking technologies are slated to dramatically increase in both scale and speed, enabling much faster access to data collected from billions of connected devices. This supercharged information highway is envisioned to play an important role across several industries, ranging from medicine to manufacturing. Major advances in 5G, including new core network features will make it easier to customize the network at a wide variety of locations.
January 6, 2017 ,
Booz Allen Hamilton Conference Center
DARPA’s Microsystems Technology Office (MTO) is hosting a Proposers Day to provide information to potential applicants on the structure and objectives of the new A MEchanically Based Antenna (AMEBA) program. The objective of the AMEBA program is to develop mechanically driven transmitters producing radio frequency (RF) signals at carrier frequencies below 30 kHz. The AMEBA program will invest in basic research and development towards low-loss, precision-controlled, mechanical RF transmitter systems. AMEBA will also develop electric and magnetic materials that enable practical realizations of the mechanical transmitter concepts and designs.
November 13-17, 2017,
DARPA Bay Area SDR Hackfest
A hackfest, otherwise known as a hackathon or code sprint, is a common way for free and open source software (FOSS) projects to engage and enable communities. As science and technology continue to advance and further accelerate the speed of innovation, DARPA's interest in building common platforms, toolsets, and fundamental skills has grown. That interest has been a long-standing tenet of the Free and Open-Source Software (FOSS) community as well, and DARPA believes that building an engagement between the FOSS and DARPA communities will allow both communities to benefit from and promote the use of advanced technology. DARPA's Software Defined Radio (SDR) Hackfests are set up to engage a community that includes more than just the core developers of a project.