Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Microstructures

Relating to structures ranging from the atomic to millimeter scales

Showing 8 results for Microstructures + Manufacturing RSS
Uncertainties in materials and component manufacturing processes are a primary cause of cost escalation and delay during the development, testing and early production of defense systems. In addition, fielded military platforms may have unanticipated performance problems, despite large investment and extensive testing of their key components and subassemblies. These uncertainties and performance problems are often the result of the random variations and non-uniform scaling of manufacturing processes. These challenges, in turn, lead to counterproductive resistance to adoption of new, innovative manufacturing technologies that could offer better results.
Military platforms and structures, such as vehicles, ships, aircraft and buildings, must withstand transient shock, vibrations and other structural loads in a variety of demanding operational environments. These frequent and varying transient loads are often transmitted to occupants, which can degrade warfighters’ performance by creating discomfort and injuries. In addition, varying loads can lead to shortened service life for the military platforms, as well as the equipment inside. Currently, structures designed to achieve high stiffness for static loads (dead weight) typically can’t adapt to or dampen dynamic loads well. Conversely, structures designed for high damping do not carry conventional loads as efficiently.
Program Manager
Dr. William Carter is a program manager in the Defense Sciences Office. He was formerly the director of the Materials and Microsystems Laboratory at HRL Laboratories. He received his doctorate in applied physics from Harvard University in 1997 and has more than 15 years of experience managing government and industrial materials research programs. His background spans applied physics, materials science, and mechanics.