Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Microchips and Components

Relating to miniaturized electronic circuitry and its components and features

Showing 25 results for Microchips + Integration RSS
November 1, 2018, 8:30 AM ET,
DARPA Conference Center
The Microsystems Technology Office is holding a Proposers Day to provide information to potential proposers on the objectives of the new program. PIPES will develop optical I/O for emerging data movement needs of commercial and military systems. PIPES seeks to emplace integrated optical transceiver capabilities into cutting-edge multi-chip modules (e.g., field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), graphical processing units (GPUs), central processing units (CPUs), and application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs)) for 2023-era microelectronics with performance well beyond currently available solutions. In parallel, PIPES aims to develop novel optical I/O approaches and advanced optical packaging and switching technologies to satisfy data movement demands of highly parallel systems in the 2028 timeframe. Additionally, the program will combine the advanced microelectronics capabilities of commercial industry, innovative photonics solutions from research communities, and DoD-specific application drivers from the defense industry into a framework for long-term technology availability by establishing and supporting a domestic technology ecosystem.
The explosive growth in mobile and telecommunication markets has pushed the semiconductor industry toward integration of digital, analog, and mixed-signal blocks into system-on-chip (SoC) solutions. Advanced silicon (Si) complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology has enabled this integration, but has also led to a rise in costs associated with design and processing. Driven by aggressive digital CMOS scaling for high-volume products, Intellectual Property (IP) reuse has emerged as a tool to help lower design costs associated with advanced SoCs.
The Direct On-Chip Digital Optical Synthesizer (DODOS) program seeks to create a technological revolution in optical frequency control analogous to the disruptive advances in microwave frequency control in the 1940s.
The general-purpose computer has remained the dominant computing architecture for the last 50 years, driven largely by the relentless pace of Moore’s Law. As this trajectory shows signs of slowing, however, it has become increasingly more challenging to achieve performance gains from generalized hardware, setting the stage for a resurgence in specialized architectures. Today’s specialized, application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) — hardware customized for a specific application — offer limited flexibility and are costly to design, fabricate, and program.
Next-generation intelligent systems supporting Department of Defense (DoD) applications like artificial intelligence, autonomous vehicles, shared spectrum communication, electronic warfare, and radar require processing efficiency that is orders of magnitude beyond what is available through current commercial electronics. Reaching the performance levels required by these DoD applications however will require developing highly complex system-on-chip (SoC) platforms that leverage the most advanced integrated circuit technologies.