Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Microchips and Components

Relating to miniaturized electronic circuitry and its components and features

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Due to engineering limitations and cost constraints, the dynamics of the electronic industry are continually changing. Commercial companies increasingly recognize the need to differentiate their products through research in areas other than device scaling, such as new circuit architectures and computing algorithms.
The unrelenting progression of Moore's Law has created a steady cadence to ever-smaller transistors and more powerful chips, allowing billions of transistors to be integrated on a single system-on-chip (SoC). However, engineering productivity has not kept pace with Moore's Law, leading to prohibitive increases in development costs and team sizes for leading-edge SoC design. To help manage the complexity of SoC development, design reuse in the form of Intellectual Property (IP) modules has become the primary strategy.
Driven by the rapidly evolving national security threat landscape, future defense systems will need access to low size, weight, and power (SWaP) artificial intelligence (AI) solutions that can rapidly transition from idea to practice. In recent years, the ability to learn from large datasets has advanced significantly due to increases in hardware performance, advances in machine learning (ML) algorithms, and the availability of high quality open datasets.
In modern warfare, decisions are driven by information. That information can come in the form of thousands of sensors providing information, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) data; logistics/supply-chain and personnel performance measurements; or a host of other sources and formats. The ability to exploit this data to understand and predict the world around us is an asymmetric advantage for the Department of Defense (DoD).
The vision for the Systems of Neuromorphic Adaptive Plastic Scalable Electronics (SyNAPSE) program is to develop low-power electronic neuromorphic computers that scale to biological levels.