Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Algorithms

A process or rule set used for calculations or other problem-solving operations

Showing 40 results for Algorithms + Programs RSS
The unrelenting progression of Moore's Law has created a steady cadence to ever-smaller transistors and more powerful chips, allowing billions of transistors to be integrated on a single system-on-chip (SoC). However, engineering productivity has not kept pace with Moore's Law, leading to prohibitive increases in development costs and team sizes for leading-edge SoC design. To help manage the complexity of SoC development, design reuse in the form of Intellectual Property (IP) modules has become the primary strategy.
Computational capability is an enabler for nearly every military system, but increases in this capability are limited by available system power and constraints on the ability to dissipate heat. This is a challenge for embedded applications such as soldier-borne applications, UAVs and command and control systems on submarines. Today’s intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) systems have sensors that collect far more information than they can process in real time; as a result, what could be invaluable real-time intelligence data in the hands of our warfighters is simply discarded, or perhaps recorded and processed hours or days after it was collected.
Researchers have demonstrated effective attacks on machine learning (ML) algorithms. These attacks can cause high-confidence misclassifications of input data, even if the attacker lacks detailed knowledge of the ML classifier algorithm and/or training data. Developing effective defenses against such attacks is essential if ML is to be used for defense, security, or health and safety applications.
From phony news on Web sites to terrorist propaganda on social media to recruitment videos posted by extremists, conflict in the information domain is becoming a ubiquitous addition to traditional battlespaces. Given the pace of growth in social media and other networked communications, this bustling domain of words and images—once relegated to the sidelines of strategic planning—is poised to become ever more critical to national security and military success around the globe.
Most camera designers seek to maximize spatial resolution and signal-to-noise (SNR). A wealth of information in the optical domain, however, is lost under those constraints. Specialty cameras exist to capture other types of information, but are not normally able to provide high SNR imagery at high spatial resolution from a single focal plane, and are used infrequently due to demands of additional camera systems. Today’s imaging systems primarily perform a single or limited set of measurements due, in part, to the underlying readout integrated circuits (ROICs), which sample the signal of interest and transfer the values off of the chip. Typically, ROICs are designed for a specific mode of operation, and, in essence, are application specific integrated circuits (ASICs).