Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Algorithms

A process or rule set used for calculations or other problem-solving operations

Showing 35 results for Algorithms + Complexity RSS
July 23-25, 2018,
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DARPA’s Microsystems Technology Office is hosting the first annual Electronics Resurgence Initiative (ERI) Summit. The three-day event will bring together those most impacted by the coming inflection in Moore’s Law, including senior representatives from the commercial sector, defense industrial base, academia, and government, to promote collaboration and cooperation on shaping the future direction of U.S. semiconductor innovation. The event will also highlight progress and opportunities within DARPA’s ERI research programs.
May 13, 2016,
Executive Conference Center
The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) is sponsoring a Proposers Day to provide information to potential proposers on the objectives of an anticipated Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) for the TRAnsformative DESign (TRADES) program. The Proposers Day will be held on Friday, May 13, 2016 from 8:30 AM to 12:30 PM (EDT) at the Executive Conference Center (4075 Wilson Blvd. Suite 350 Arlington, VA 22203).
The ultimate goal of the DARPA Accelerated Computation for Efficient Scientific Simulation (ACCESS) is to demonstrate new, specialized benchtop technology that can solve large problems in complex physical systems on the hour timescale, compared to existing methods that require full cluster-scale supercomputing resources and take weeks to months. The core principle of the program is to leverage advances in optics, MEMS, additive manufacturing, and other emerging technologies to develop new non-traditional hybrid analog and digital computational means.
Accurate multi-physics simulation codes are essential for understanding the behavior of complex DoD systems, but they are generally not available from the commercial sector and have to be custom built. Current approaches to building simulation codes scale poorly with the number of interacting physics involved and often introduce inaccuracies that are difficult to trace and quantify.
The general-purpose computer has remained the dominant computing architecture for the last 50 years, driven largely by the relentless pace of Moore’s Law. As this trajectory shows signs of slowing, however, it has become increasingly more challenging to achieve performance gains from generalized hardware, setting the stage for a resurgence in specialized architectures. Today’s specialized, application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) — hardware customized for a specific application — offer limited flexibility and are costly to design, fabricate, and program.