Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Manufacturing

Manufacturing

Showing 78 results for Manufacturing RSS
The Manufacturable Gradient Index Optics (M-GRIN) program seeks to advance Gradient Index (GRIN) design and fabrication technology. This program will develop new lens design methods and tools coupled to fabrication processes and manufacturing tolerances that will provide a pathway to a scalable manufacturing system, which can flexibly produce lenses in units of one to thousands. DARPA seeks to design, fabricate and demonstrate manufacturing feasibility of GRIN-based optical assemblies. The program will address all of the following technology areas: 1) materials development, 2) optical element design, 3) test and evaluation methods (metrology), and 4) manufacturing.
A substantial portion of the Department of Defense (DoD) budget is spent on training personnel to maintain highly complex electromechanical systems, often in austere environments where long logistical supply chains challenge the ability to obtain spare parts in a timely manner. Today’s DoD deploys some machine shops and other fabrication capabilities in-theater, but these facilities provide only a small fraction of needed components. This is largely due to limited access to the adaptive manufacturing technology and comprehensive design expertise necessary for in-theater manufacturing.
The Materials Architectures and Characterization for Hypersonics (MACH) program aims to develop and demonstrate new materials architectures for sharp, shape-stable, cooled leading edges for hypersonic vehicles. The program will investigate innovative approaches that enable revolutionary advances in the materials, design and implementation of shape-stable, high heat flux capable leading edge systems.
Military platforms—such as ships, aircraft and ground vehicles—rely on advanced materials to make them lighter, stronger and more resistant to stress, heat and other harsh environmental conditions. Currently, the process for developing new materials to field in platforms frequently takes more than a decade. This lengthy process often means that developers of new military platforms are forced to rely on decades-old, mature materials because potentially more advanced materials are still being developed and tested, and are considered too large a risk to be implemented into platform designs.
Many defense electronics are susceptible to radiation and high temperatures. Developing electronics that can withstand harsh conditions would expand the types of environments in which DoD electronics may be used.