Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Manufacturing

Manufacturing

Showing 70 results for Manufacturing RSS
03/26/2018
Leo Christodoulou is the Chief Technologist, a direct report to the CTO of The Boeing Company.
03/26/2018
Michael McGrath is a DARPA alumnus with broad government and industry experience, including: VP for Systems and Operations Analysis at Analytic Services Inc. (ANSER); chairman of the board of Advanced Technology International; Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for RDT&E; VP for Government Business at the Sarnoff Corporation (former RCA corporate lab); Assistant Deputy Undersecretary for Dual Use and Commercial Programs in OSD; Program Manager at DARPA, where he managed a portfolio of manufacturing technology programs; and OSD Director of the DoD Computer-aided Acquisition and Logistics Support program.
03/26/2018
Jim Williams is Professor of Materials, Science, and Engineering and Honda Chair Emeritus at The Ohio State University.
01/26/2017
Microelectronics support nearly all Department of Defense (DoD) activities, enabling capabilities such as the global positioning system, radar, command and control, and communications. Ensuring secure access to leading-edge microelectronics, however, is a challenge. The changing global semiconductor industry and the sophistication of U.S. adversaries, who might target military electronic components, suggest the need for an updated microelectronics security framework.
01/01/1980

In the late 1970's, DARPA initiated a program with Lockheed Space Systems Division to develop the technology of welding aluminum-lithium alloys, which would combine high stiffness with low density and therefore lower weight. At the time, no one understood how to prepare these materials for welding and how to control impurities in the metals and welding process. Such control would be critical for producing materials repeatedly with predictable behavior and performance.

Within 18 months, metallurgists at Lockheed had developed the welding techniques for the 80/90 Al/Li alloy and applied it to the construction of space hardware. One of the most impressive structures made from this material was the Titan missile payload adapter, which was 14 feet in diameter and 17 feet high and fabricated from 3" thick metal plate. By using this alloy, a 10% weight saving was achieved compared to the prior incarnation of that rocket components. The weight savings translated into millions of dollars at cost savings when it came to delivering hardware to obit. This material system made it into classified DoD applications as well. Lockheed scaled the process up to 400,000 lb/year of Al-Li alloys for the next four years.