Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Exploitation

Portfolio of technologies for tactical and strategic situational awareness

Showing 37 results for ISR + Programs RSS
The Manufacturable Gradient Index Optics (M-GRIN) program seeks to advance Gradient Index (GRIN) design and fabrication technology. This program will develop new lens design methods and tools coupled to fabrication processes and manufacturing tolerances that will provide a pathway to a scalable manufacturing system, which can flexibly produce lenses in units of one to thousands. DARPA seeks to design, fabricate and demonstrate manufacturing feasibility of GRIN-based optical assemblies. The program will address all of the following technology areas: 1) materials development, 2) optical element design, 3) test and evaluation methods (metrology), and 4) manufacturing.
The past decade has seen explosive growth in development and training of artificial intelligence (AI) systems. However, as AI has taken on progressively more complex problems, the amount of computation required to train the largest AI systems has been increasing ten-fold annually. While AI advances are beginning to have a deep impact in digital computing processes, trade-offs between computational capability, resources and size, weight, and power consumption (SWaP) will become increasingly critical in the near future.
The Military Imaging and Surveillance Technology (MIST) program seeks to develop a fundamentally new optical Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) capability able to provide high-resolution 3-D images to locate and identify a target at much longer ranges than is possible with existing optical systems.
The MTM program aims to develop sensors and exploitation techniques capable of performing wide-area searches to detect high-value targets. Program design will provide the ability to identify high-value adversary targets and to maintain positive chain-of-custody hand-offs.
| A2/AD | ISR | Sensors |
Free-space optics today requires a telescope, bulk lasers with mechanical beam-steering, detectors, and electronics. The Modular Optical Aperture Building Blocks (MOABB) program seeks to design all of these components into a single integrated device. In what would be deemed as the most complex electronic-photonic circuit ever fashioned, the program’s performers will work to create a wafer-scale system that is 100x smaller and lighter than conventional systems and can steer the optical beam 1,000x faster than mechanical components.