Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Integration

Compatible interconnection of disparate components and systems

Showing 50 results for Integration RSS
05/15/2018
Dr. Gordon Keeler joined DARPA in August 2017 as a Program Manager in the Microsystems Technology Office (MTO). His objective is to accelerate the development of emerging photonics, electronics, and integration technologies to open new pathways toward revolutionary optical microsystems.
05/15/2018
Dr. John Burke joined DARPA as a Program Manager in the Microsystems Technology Office (MTO) in August 2017. His research interests include the development of high-stability, low-noise sensors and frequency synthesis to enable new positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT) and remote detection capabilities. He is particularly interested in the integration of modern atomic physics techniques (e.g. laser cooling and trapping) with photonic circuits and atom chips to reduce the complexity, cost, and size of these techniques while increasing their robustness and reliability for use outside of a laboratory environment.
04/17/2018
Dr. William Chappell is director of the Microsystems Technology Office (MTO). Serving in this position since June 2014, he has focused the office on three key thrusts important to national security. These thrusts include ensuring unfettered use of the electromagnetic spectrum, building an alternative business model for acquiring advanced DoD electronics that feature built-in trust, and developing circuit architectures for next-generation machine learning. Under Dr. Chappell’s leadership, MTO is striving to develop the basic underpinnings of computation and sensing needed for an effective, information-driven military. As our daily activities rely more and more on the digital realm, these technologies will also impact society as a whole.
01/13/2017
In this episode DARPA’s podcast, MTO program manager Dan Green discusses the Agency’s work to develop semiconductor materials, among them gallium arsenide and now gallium nitride, that open pathways to both military and civilian technology in categories spanning from electronic warfare to radar to communications.
01/15/2013
Most people are familiar with the concept of RADAR. Radio frequency (RF) waves travel through the atmosphere, reflect off of a target, and return to the RADAR system to be processed. The amount of time it takes to return correlates to the object’s distance. In recent decades, this technology has been revolutionized by electronically scanned (phased) arrays (ESAs), which transmit the RF waves in a particular direction without mechanical movement. Each emitter varies its phase and amplitude to form a RADAR beam in a particular direction through constructive and destructive interference with other emitters.