Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Injury and Trauma

Relating to diagnosis and treatment of grievous physical and mental injury

Showing 6 results for Injury + Therapy RSS
10/26/2016
Pressure—the physical quantity of an experience of touch—is a fundamental dimension of human perception, conveying to the brain not just that the skin is in contact with something, but also how intense the contact is. That awareness is what enables people to, for instance, gently but securely handle an egg without squeezing so hard that the shell cracks.
The Biostasis program aims to extend the time for lifesaving medical treatment, often referred to as “the Golden Hour,” following traumatic injury or acute infection, thus increasing survivability for military personnel operating in far-forward conditions with limited access to medical professionals or trauma centers. To do so, Biostasis is developing novel chemical biology approaches that reversibly and controllably slow biological systems without cold-chain to stabilize and protect their functional capacity until medical intervention is possible.
With a focus on wounded warriors and facilitating their return to military service, the Hand Proprioception and Touch Interfaces (HAPTIX) program is pursuing key technologies to enable precision control of and sensory feedback from sensor-equipped upper-limb prosthetic devices. If successful, the resulting system would provide users near-natural control of prosthetic hands and arms via bi-directional peripheral nerve implants. The program has a strong focus on technology handoff and aims to create and transition clinically relevant technology in support of wounded warriors suffering from single or multiple limb loss.
The Reorganization and Plasticity to Accelerate Injury Recovery (REPAIR) program aims to uncover the mechanisms underlying neural computation and reorganization to improve modeling of the brain and our ability to interface with it.
The Surviving Blood Loss (SBL) program is developing novel strategies to radically extend the time injured warfighters can survive critical blood loss on the battlefield before initiation of fluid and blood resuscitation. Achieving this goal will allow increased time—as much as hours or days—for evacuation, triage, and initiation of supportive therapies.