Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Imagery and Visualization

Visual representations of data and information

Showing 31 results for Imagery RSS
The warfighter's effectiveness in current and future combat missions can be severely limited by inadequate target discrimination, and an inability to view the operational scene with larger fields of view and longer standoff distances. For ground combat and near-ground support operations where tactical information is urgently needed to make timely decisions, there is a significant capability gap for day and night intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR).
Conventional optical imaging systems today largely limit themselves to the measurement of light intensity, providing two-dimensional renderings of three-dimensional scenes and ignoring significant amounts of additional information that may be carried by captured light.
U.S. forces are often immersed in a highly complex, rapidly evolving, hostile environment containing a diverse collection of potential threats. Despite significant recent advances in both the platforms (e.g., unmanned aerial vehicles) and the sensor payloads (e.g., very high resolution cameras) employed within the wide array of modern Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) capabilities, these conventional solutions do not currently provide the spatial, temporal or functional capabilities required by the individual warfighter.
Adversaries often take photos and videos to claim responsibility for events or to illustrate capabilities. This media is sometimes confiscated by the DoD from a variety of devices, including laptops, cellphone cameras and memory cards. The volume of this visual media is quickly outpacing our ability to review, let alone analyze the contents of every image.
| Data | Imagery | ISR |
The low cost of digital imaging devices has allowed them to become ubiquitous consumer products. This low cost is made possible by leveraging a mature complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) processing infrastructure and the ability to fabricate complete focal plane arrays (FPAs) at the wafer scale. A similar trend is occurring at a smaller scale with thermal imaging technologies. Microbolometers that are sensitive in the LWIR spectrum are also manufactured at the wafer scale and the resulting cost reduction is enabling thermal imagers at consumer-grade price points.