Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Restore and Maintain Warfighter Abilities

Relating to the restoration and optimization of human health

Showing 41 results for Health + Programs RSS
The Autonomous Diagnostics to Enable Prevention and Therapeutics (ADEPT) program supports individual troop readiness and total force health protection by developing technologies to rapidly identify and respond to threats posed by natural and engineered diseases and toxins. A subset of ADEPT technologies specifically support use by personnel with minimal medical training, delivering centralized laboratory capabilities even in the low-resource environments typical of many military operations. The program is part of a portfolio of DARPA-funded research aimed at providing options for preempting or mitigating constantly evolving infectious disease threats.
The Battlefield Medicine program supports military readiness in far-forward deployed settings by overcoming logistical obstacles to manufacturing and delivery of urgently needed pharmaceutical products used to treat emerging threats.
The Bioelectronics for Tissue Regeneration (BETR) program will develop technology aimed at speeding warfighter recovery, and thus resilience, by directly intervening in wound healing. To do this, researchers will build an adaptive system that uses actuators to biochemically or biophysically stimulate tissue, sensors to track the body’s complex response to that stimulation, and adaptive learning algorithms to integrate sensor data and dictate intervention to the actuators.
The Biostasis program aims to extend the time for lifesaving medical treatment, often referred to as “the Golden Hour,” following traumatic injury or acute infection, thus increasing survivability for military personnel operating in far-forward conditions with limited access to medical professionals or trauma centers. To do so, Biostasis is developing novel chemical biology approaches that reversibly and controllably slow biological systems without cold-chain to stabilize and protect their functional capacity until medical intervention is possible.
The DoD requires timely and comprehensive threat detection to support overall readiness, counter the spread of disease, and promote stabilization missions. State of the art diagnostic and biosurveillance systems are unable to keep pace with disease outbreaks and fail to support decision-making at the time and place of need. The “Detect It with Gene Editing Technologies” (DIGET) program aims to leverage advances in gene editing technologies to develop field-forward diagnostic and biosurveillance technologies that enable detection of any threat, anytime, anywhere.