Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Restore and Maintain Warfighter Abilities

Relating to the restoration and optimization of human health

Showing 6 results for Health + Agency RSS
DARPA’s Biological Technologies Office develops capabilities that embrace the unique properties of biology—adaptation, replication, complexity—and applies those features to revolutionize how the United States defends the homeland and prepares and protects its Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, and Marines. BTO is helping the Department of Defense expand technology-driven capabilities to detect novel threats and protect U.S. force readiness, deploy physiological interventions to maintain operational advantage, support warfighter performance, and focus on operational biotechnology for mission success.
05/18/2015
From programmable microbes to human-machine symbiosis, biological technologies are expanding our definition of technology and redefining how we interact with and use biology.
04/02/2013
Today, at a White House event, the President unveiled a bold new research initiative designed to revolutionize the understanding of the human brain. As part of this initiative, DARPA intends to invest roughly $50 million in 2014 with the goal of understanding the dynamic functions of the brain and demonstrating breakthrough applications based on these insights.
ACTING DIRECTOR, DEFENSE ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS AGENCY
Dr. Peter Highnam is the acting director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). Prior to this assignment, he was the deputy director at DARPA from February 2018 – January 2020.
04/06/2020
The United States confronts a potential national security threat each time a new outbreak of infectious disease occurs anywhere in the world. Our military must be able to deploy safely to wherever they are required to operate. The disease threats seen abroad can also impact the civilian population. The nationwide spread of H1N1 flu in 2009, of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome in Indiana in 2013, and the presence of Ebola in Texas in 2014 are recent reminders of this reality. As the current COVID-19 pandemic shows, an unwarned highly contagious virus can rapidly overwhelm medical systems worldwide.