Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Restore and Maintain Warfighter Abilities

Relating to the restoration and optimization of human health

Showing 115 results for Health RSS
Currently, understanding and assessing the readiness of the warfighter involves medical intervention with the help of advanced equipment, such as electrocardiographs (EKGs) and other specialized medical devices, that are too expensive and cumbersome to employ continuously or without supervision in non-controlled environments. On the other hand, currently 92 percent of adults in the United States own a cell phone, which could be used as the basis for continuous, passive health, and readiness assessment.
| AI | Analytics | Data | Health |
The amount of equipment and gear carried by today’s dismounted warfighter can exceed 100 pounds, as troops conduct patrols for extended periods over rugged and hilly terrain. The added weight while bending, running, squatting, jumping and crawling in a tactical environment increases the risk of musculoskeletal injury, particularly on vulnerable areas such as ankles, knees and lumbar spine. Increased load weight also causes increase in physical fatigue, which further decreases the body’s ability to perform warfighter tasks and protect against both acute and chronic injury.
| Ground | Health |
Uncontrolled blood loss is the leading cause of death for warfighters on the battlefield, according to the U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research. The vast majority of such fatalities are from wounds that are not accessible by combat medics for traditional treatments, like direct compression. For example, in the case of internal injuries to the abdominal cavity, medics can neither visualize the damage nor access it to provide treatment. As a result, rapid and uncontrolled blood loss often leads to death before transport from the battlefield to a surgical setting can occur.
Program Manager
COL Matthew Hepburn, MC, USA joined DARPA as a program manager in 2013. He aims to address the dynamic threats of emerging infectious diseases with potential impact on national security.
Program Manager
Dr. Eric Van Gieson joined DARPA as a Program Manager in August 2017 with the goal of using host-based methods to mitigate the impacts of emerging disease threats. He intends to explore epigenetic and real-time monitoring approaches that can dynamically guide healthcare decisions and therapy, and new methods of increasing patient survival in austere environments using intelligent systems partnered with local care providers.