Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Globalization

Relating to the challenge of democratization of advanced technologies and efforts to protect supply chains

Showing 24 results for Globalization RSS
July 23-25, 2018,
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DARPA’s Microsystems Technology Office is hosting the first annual Electronics Resurgence Initiative (ERI) Summit. The three-day event will bring together those most impacted by the coming inflection in Moore’s Law, including senior representatives from the commercial sector, defense industrial base, academia, and government, to promote collaboration and cooperation on shaping the future direction of U.S. semiconductor innovation. The event will also highlight progress and opportunities within DARPA’s ERI research programs.
September 20, 2016,
DARPA Conference Center
The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Microsystems Technology Office (MTO) is sponsoring a Proposers Day to present its technical vision and mission and to provide information to potential proposers on the MTO Office-Wide Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) and the anticipated Commercial Performer Program Announcement.
March 23, 2018,
Webcast
The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) is sponsoring a Proposers Day webcast to provide information to potential proposers on the objectives of a Research Announcement (RA) for the Polyplexus Pilot program (Note: participation in the pilot program is open to scientists and researchers at educational institutions only).
Military sensor systems typically require between three and eight years to complete, resulting in sensor technology unable to keep pace with rapidly evolving mission needs. Commercial systems of similar complexity, forced by competitive pressures, are routinely developed in one to two years.
It can cost up to $100 million and take more than two years for a large team of engineers to design custom integrated circuits for specific tasks, such as synchronizing the activity of unmanned aerial vehicles or the real-time conversion of raw radar data into tactically useful 3-D imagery. This is why Defense Department engineers often turn to inexpensive and readily available general-purpose circuits, and then rely on software to make those circuits run the specialized operations they need.