Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Electronic Warfare

Manipulation of the electromagnetic spectrum for military advantage

Showing 36 results for EW RSS
04/12/2018
Mr. Neil Fox joined DARPA in April 2017 as a program manager in the Strategic Technology Office (STO). His technical specialty areas include secure wireless communications, distributed systems, electronic warfare, specialized radar, PNT, and cyber physical systems. Prior to joining STO, Mr. Fox held a senior technical position at the MITRE Corporation, serving as a subject matter expert in communications, distributed electronic warfare, and cyber physical systems to the Department of Defense (DoD), Department of Homeland Security and Department of Justice.
Since its inception in 1991, DARPA’s Microsystems Technology Office (MTO) has been working to create and prevent strategic surprise through investments in compact microelectronic components such as microprocessors, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), and photonic devices. MTO-derived innovations and advanced capabilities in areas such as wide-band gap materials, phased-array radars, high-energy lasers, and infrared imaging have helped the United States establish and maintain technological superiority for more than two decades.
DARPA’s Strategic Technology Office (STO) is focused on technologies that enable fighting as a network to increase military effectiveness, cost leverage, and adaptability.
05/18/2015
DARPA’s Strategic Technology Office (STO) is focused on technologies that enable fighting as a network to increase military effectiveness, cost leverage, and adaptability. STO's areas of interest include: Battle Management, Command and Control; Communications and Networks; Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance; Electronic Warfare; Positioning, Navigation, and Timing; and Foundational Strategic Technologies and Systems.
01/01/2012
For years, DARPA and its Service partners pursued the technically daunting task of developing high-power-density, wide-band-gap semiconductor components in the recognition that, whatever the end-state task, U.S. forces would need electronics that could operate and engage at increasing range. The result was a series of fundamental advances involving gallium nitride-enabled arrays, which now provide significant benefits in a wide range of applications in the national security domain.