Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Infectious Disease

Relating to ailments caused by pathogens

Showing 12 results for Disease + Med-Devices RSS
11/15/2019
In a twist on how gene editing technology might be applied in the future, DARPA’s newest biotechnology funding opportunity aims to incorporate gene editors into detectors for distributed health biosurveillance and rapid, point-of-need diagnostics for endemic, emerging, and engineered pathogenic threats. The “Detect It with Gene Editing Technologies” (DIGET) program could help the Department of Defense maintain force readiness by informing rapid medical response and increasing the standard of care for troops, and preserve geopolitical stability by preventing the spread of infectious disease from becoming a driver of conflict.
December 11, 2019, 8:00 AM EST,
Hyatt Regency
The Biological Technologies Office is holding a Proposers Day meeting covering the new Detect It with Gene Editing Technologies (DIGET) program. DIGET aims to incorporate gene editors into detectors for distributed health biosurveillance and rapid, point-of-need diagnostics for endemic, emerging, and engineered pathogenic threats. The DIGET vision incorporates two devices: a handheld, disposable point-of-need device that screens samples for at least 10 pathogens or host biomarkers at once, combined with a massively multiplexed detection platform capable of screening clinical and environmental samples for more than 1,000 targets simultaneously.
The Dialysis-Like Therapeutics (DLT) program aims to support force protection and military readiness by improving critical care in low-resource environments and delivering a new tool for rapid response to emerging infectious disease threats. DLT specifically addresses a life-threatening blood infection known as sepsis, but DARPA is working to expand the DLT technology to also mitigate threats from harmful bacteria, viruses, fungi, and toxic agents in the blood.
The Microphysiological Systems (MPS) program supports military readiness by enabling timely evaluation of the safety and efficacy of novel medical countermeasures against a wide range of natural and man-made health threats, including emerging infectious disease and chemical or biological attack. Testing these types of countermeasures is particularly challenging using current methods because it is often both unethical and impractical to evaluate countermeasures using human clinical trials. Instead, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) must base its determination of efficacy and toxicity on data from animal studies, despite the fact that animal models have limited relevance to humans and poorly predict effects in humans.
07/10/2015
The White House announced the BRAIN initiative in April 2013. Today, the initiative is supported by several federal agencies as well as dozens of technology firms, academic institutions, scientists and other key contributors to the field of neuroscience. DARPA is supporting the BRAIN initiative through a number of programs, continuing a legacy of DARPA investment in neurotechnology that extends back to the 1970s.