Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Decentralization

The ability to update underlying capabilities in large and massively complex systems inexpensively and quickly is crucial to avoid outdated and inferior electronics. The increasing complexity of our major military systems precludes rapid change so it is essential that we move towards a new model that allows for quick adoption of new and modern electronics.

Showing 12 results for Decentralization + ISR RSS
04/12/2018
Dr. Craig Lawrence joined DARPA in 2013 as a Program Manager for the Strategic Technology Office (STO). Dr. Lawrence’s interests are in battle management, command and control (BMC2); autonomy, optimization and control theory; and modeling and simulation. Prior to joining DARPA, Dr. Lawrence was a Technical Director in the Technology Solutions division at BAE Systems. He spent 15 years in industry leading large DoD research and development programs in diverse technical areas including command and control for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR); planning and optimal resource management; modeling and simulation; and machine learning, control theory, and optimization-based design.
04/12/2018
Lt. Col. Jimmy “Reverend” Jones joined DARPA in October 2016 as a program manager in the Strategic Technology Office. Prior to his arrival, he was the chief of the Advanced Countermeasures Branch in Air Force Special Programs at the Pentagon. Lt. Col. Jones is a U.S. Air Force test pilot with combat experience as a Wild Weasel flying suppression of enemy air defenses missions in Operation Iraqi Freedom.
05/18/2015
DARPA’s Strategic Technology Office (STO) is focused on technologies that enable fighting as a network to increase military effectiveness, cost leverage, and adaptability. STO's areas of interest include: Battle Management, Command and Control; Communications and Networks; Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance; Electronic Warfare; Positioning, Navigation, and Timing; and Foundational Strategic Technologies and Systems.
01/11/2013
Today, cost and complexity limit the Navy to fewer weapons systems and platforms, so resources are strained to operate over vast maritime areas. Unmanned systems and sensors are commonly envisioned to fill coverage gaps and deliver action at a distance. However, for all of the advances in sensing, autonomy, and unmanned platforms in recent years, the usefulness of such technology becomes academic when faced with the question, “How do you get the systems there?” DARPA’s Upward Falling Payloads program seeks to address that challenge.
03/26/2014
Cost and complexity limit the number of ships and weapon systems the Navy can support in forward operating areas. A natural response is to offset these costs and risks with unmanned and distributed systems. But how do such systems get there in the first place?