Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Decentralization

The ability to update underlying capabilities in large and massively complex systems inexpensively and quickly is crucial to avoid outdated and inferior electronics. The increasing complexity of our major military systems precludes rapid change so it is essential that we move towards a new model that allows for quick adoption of new and modern electronics.

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Next-generation intelligent systems supporting Department of Defense (DoD) applications like artificial intelligence, autonomous vehicles, shared spectrum communication, electronic warfare, and radar require processing efficiency that is orders of magnitude beyond what is available through current commercial electronics. Reaching the performance levels required by these DoD applications however will require developing highly complex system-on-chip (SoC) platforms that leverage the most advanced integrated circuit technologies.
Due to engineering limitations and cost constraints, the dynamics of the electronic industry are continually changing. Commercial companies increasingly recognize the need to differentiate their products through research in areas other than device scaling, such as new circuit architectures and computing algorithms.
For decades, Global Positioning System (GPS) technology has been incorporated into vehicles and munitions to meet DoD requirements for precision guidance and navigation. GPS dependence creates a critical vulnerability for many DoD systems in situations where the GPS signal is degraded or unavailable.
The Chip-Scale Atomic Clock (CSAC) effort created ultra-miniaturized, low-power, atomic time and frequency reference units. The development of CSAC enabled ultra-miniaturized and ultra-low power atomic clocks for high-security Ultra High Frequency (UHF) communication and jam-resistant GPS receivers. The use of CSAC technology can greatly improve the mobility and robustness of any military system or platform with sophisticated UHF communication and/or navigation requirements.
The Microscale Rate Integrating Gyroscope (MRIG) effort seeks to create micromachined vibratory gyroscopes that can be instrumented to directly measure the angle of rotation, extending the dynamic range and eliminating the need to integrate angular rate information. If successful, MRIG will enable high performance, low cost gyroscopes which, when integrated in Inertial Measurement Units (IMU), will be small enough for adaptation in guided munitions’ platforms, hand-held devices, and add-in portable Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) units.