Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Data Analysis at Massive Scales

Extracting information and insights from massive datasets; "big data"; "data mining"

Showing 18 results for Data + Cyber RSS
March 6-7, 2019,
Hilton Alexandria Mark Center
DARPA has long been a leader in the field of artificial intelligence, establishing the foundations of the field and leading creation of expert systems, and then supporting the expansion of machine learning. The agency’s most recent investments — undertaken as part of DARPA’s $2 billion AI Next campaign — are supporting a shift in AI systems from tools alone to trusted, collaborative partners in problem solving. To increase awareness of DARPA’s expansive AI R&D efforts, the agency is hosting an Artificial Intelligence Colloquium (AIC) in March 2019. The event will bring together the Department of Defense research community and stakeholders to learn more about DARPA’s current and emerging AI programs, and discover how the technologies in development could apply to diverse missions.
September 27, 2016,
Hilton Arlington
DARPA’s Information Innovation Office (I2O) will host a Proposers Day conference to provide information to potential proposers on the objectives of the anticipated Modeling Adversarial Activity (MAA) Broad Agency Announcement (BAA). The Proposers Day will be held Tuesday, September 27, 2016, from 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM (ET) at the Hilton Arlington, located at 950 North Stafford Street, Arlington, VA. The purpose of this conference is to provide information on the MAA program, promote relevant discussion, and address questions from potential proposers.
| Cyber | Data | Math |
Networks within the United States and abroad face increasingly broad-spectrum cyber threats from numerous actors and novel attack vectors. Malicious activity also crosscuts organizational boundaries, as nefarious actors use networks with less protection to pivot into networks containing key assets. Detection of these threats requires adjustments to network and host sensors at machine speed. Additionally, the data required to detect these threats may be distributed across devices and networks. In all of these cases, the threat actors are using technology to perpetrate their attacks and hide their activities and movement, both physical and virtual, inside DoD, commercial, and Internet Access Provider (IAP) networks.
Malicious actors in cyberspace currently operate with little fear of being caught due to the fact that it is extremely difficult, in some cases perhaps even impossible, to reliably and confidently attribute actions in cyberspace to individuals. The reason cyber attribution is difficult stems at least in part from a lack of end-to-end accountability in the current Internet infrastructure.
The Memex program seeks to develop the next generation of search technologies and revolutionize the discovery, organization and presentation of search results.