Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Cyber

Relating to digital systems and information

Showing 7 results for Cyber + Interface RSS
01/01/1964

As part of an ARPA-funded experiment to find better ways for computer users to interact with computers, Douglas Engelbart of SRI—who would later work on the DARPA-sponsored ARPANET project, the Internet’s precursor—invented the computer mouse. The first mouse was carved out of wood and had just one button. Later incarnations such as this early Logitech® mouse led to the diversity of mice now on desktops around the world.

The mouse was an early example of many innovations that DARPA would help nurture into various components of the information technology landscape over the next five decades. In What Will Be (HarperCollins, 1997), author Michael Dertouzos credits DARPA with “… between a third and a half of all the major innovations in computer science and technology.”

04/18/2018
Today, Commercial off-the-shelf (COTS), Government off-the-shelf (GOTS), and Free and open-source (FOSS) software support nearly all aspects of DoD, military, and commercial operations. Securing this diverse technology base requires highly skilled hackers who reason about the functionality of software and identify novel vulnerabilities, using a suite of tools and techniques that require extensive training. While effective, the process is largely manual and requires hundreds, if not thousands, of hours of effort for each vulnerability discovered.
07/20/2018
DARPA today announced its Artificial Intelligence Exploration (AIE) program, a key component of the agency’s broader artificial intelligence (AI) investment strategy aimed at ensuring the United States maintains an advantage in this critical and rapidly accelerating technology area. AIE will constitute a series of unique funding opportunities that use streamlined contracting procedures and funding mechanisms to achieve a start date within three months of an opportunity announcement.
April 19, 2018, 1:00 PM EST,
DARPA Conference Center
DARPA’s Information Innovation Office is hosting a Proposers Day to provide information to potential applicants on the structure and objectives of the Computers and Humans Exploring Software Security (CHESS) program. The goal of the CHESS program is to research the effectiveness of enabling computers and humans to collaboratively reason over software artifacts (e.g., source code, compiled binaries, etc.) for the purpose of finding zero-day vulnerabilities at a scale and speed appropriate for the complex software ecosystem upon which the U.S. Government, military, and economy depend.
The Department of Defense (DoD) maintains information systems that depend on Commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) software, Government off-the-shelf (GOTS) software, and Free and open source (FOSS) software. Securing this diverse technology base requires highly skilled hackers who reason about the functionality of software and identify novel vulnerabilities.