Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Cyber

Relating to digital systems and information

Showing 9 results for Cyber + Opportunities RSS
May 14, 2019, 8:30 AM EDT,
DARPA Conference Center
The Information Innovation Office is holding a Proposers Day meeting to provide information to potential proposers on the objectives of the new Automated Rapid Certification Of Software (ARCOS) program and to facilitate teaming. The goal of ARCOS is to automate the evaluation of software assurance evidence so that certifiers can rapidly determine if system risk is acceptable. “Certification” is the process of determining that a system’s risk is acceptable.
April 10, 2019, 9:00 AM EDT,
DARPA Conference Center
The Microsystems Technology Office is holding a Proposers Day meeting to provide information on our new Automatic Implementation of Secure Silicon (AISS) program. AISS will address the economic and technical challenges associated with building in chip security. The program aims to automate the process of incorporating scalable defense mechanisms into chip designs, while allowing designers to explore economics versus security trade-offs, and maximize design productivity. The objective is to develop a design tool and IP ecosystem – which includes tool vendors, chip developers, IP licensers, and the open-source community – that will allow security to be inexpensively incorporated into chip designs with minimal effort and expertise, ultimately making scalable on-chip security pervasive.
Serial Interactions in Imperfect Information Games Applied to Complex Military Decision Making (SI3-CMD) builds on recent developments in artificial intelligence and game theory to enable more effective decisions in adversarial domains. SI3-CMD will explore several military decision making applications at strategic, tactical, and operational levels and develop AI/game theory techniques appropriate for their problem characteristics.
08/30/2018
The advance of technology has evolved the roles of humans and machines in conflict from direct confrontations between humans to engagements mediated by machines. Originally, humans engaged in primitive forms of combat. With the advent of the industrial era, however, humans recognized that machines could greatly enhance their warfighting capabilities. Networks then enabled teleoperation, which eventually proved vulnerable to electronic attack and subject to constraint due to long signal propagation distances and times. The next stage in warfare will involve more capable autonomous systems, but before we can allow such machines to supplement human warfighters, they must achieve far greater levels of intelligence.