Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Cyber

Relating to digital systems and information

Showing 17 results for Cyber + Networking RSS
Modern society depends on information and information depends on information systems. Timely, insightful, reliable, and relevant information is essential, particularly for national security. To ensure information advantage for the U.S. and its allies, the Information Innovation Office (I2O) sponsors basic and applied research in three thrust areas: Symbiosis, Analytics, and Cyber.
05/18/2015
Modern society depends on information and information depends on information systems. Timely, insightful, reliable, and relevant information is essential, particularly for national security. The Information Innovation Office (I2O) sponsors basic and applied research in three thrust areas to ensure information advantage for the U.S. and its allies:
01/01/1969
ARPA research played a central role in launching the “Information Revolution,” including developing or furthering much of the conceptual basis for ARPANET, a pioneering network for sharing digital resources among geographically separated computers. Its initial demonstration in 1969 led to the Internet, whose world-changing consequences unfold on a daily basis today. A seminal step in this sequence took place in 1968 when ARPA contracted BBN Technologies to build the first routers, which one year later enabled ARPANET to become operational.
01/01/2004
As part of the then three-year-old Quantum Information Science and Technology (QuIST) program, DARPA-funded researchers established the first so-called quantum key distribution network, a data-encryption framework for protecting a fiber-optic loop that connects facilities at Harvard University, Boston University, and the office of BBN Technologies in Cambridge, Mass.
01/22/2013
The Department of Defense (DoD) maintains one of the largest computer networks in the world. The network follows DoD personnel across the globe collecting, transferring and processing information in forms as diverse as data warehouses, in-the-field mobile devices and mission computers on board F-18’s. This network is also constantly changing in size and shape as new missions are undertaken and new technology is deployed. In military terms, that means the cyber terrain of the DoD network is constantly shifting.