Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Cyber

Relating to digital systems and information

Showing 107 results for Cyber RSS
November 14-16, 2018,
Hilton Washington Dulles Airport
DARPA’s Information Innovation Office is co-hosting the first annual seL4 Summit along with the Air Force Research Laboratory and General Dynamics C4 Systems. seL4 is an open-source, high-assurance, high-performance microkernel; its implementation is formally proven correct against its specification. The three-day seL4 Summit will focus on maturing seL4 kernel technology, stabilizing software distribution, expanding user adoption, and transitioning the technology into various applications. Attendees will also have the opportunity to receive hands-on training for the microkernel.
| Cyber | Formal | Trust |
April 21, 2017,
Booz Allen Hamilton Conference Center
DARPA will host a Proposers Day in support of the System Security Integrated Through Hardware and Firmware (SSITH), on Friday, April 21, 2017 at the Booz Allen Hamilton Conference Center (3811 N. Fairfax Drive, Suite 600, Arlington, VA 22203) from 8:00am to 5:00pm EDT.
The current standard method for validating a user’s identity for authentication on an information system requires humans to do something that is inherently unnatural: create, remember, and manage long, complex passwords. Moreover, as long as the session remains active, typical systems incorporate no mechanisms to verify that the user originally authenticated is the user still in control of the keyboard. Thus unauthorized individuals may improperly obtain extended access to information system resources if a password is compromised or if a user does not exercise adequate vigilance after initially authenticating at the console.
U.S. military, government and commercial IT networks face constant cyberattack from both criminal and state-sponsored adversaries. Current IT security response practices to these attacks boil down to four steps: find the invading code, unplug the affected systems, create security patches to thwart particular attacks, and apply those patches network-wide. This reactive engagement model is effective on a case-by-case basis but does not address key advantages attackers have—for example, adversaries can easily make small changes to malware that bypass patches and distribute that new malware on a massive scale.
| Cyber |
Over the past 40 years, our world has become increasingly connected. These connections have enabled major advances in national security from pervasive real-time intelligence and communications to optimal logistics. With this connectivity has come the threat of cyber attacks on both military systems and critical infrastructure. While we focus the vast majority of our security efforts on protecting computers and networks, more than 80% of cyber attacks and over 70% of those from nation states are initiated by exploiting humans rather than computer or network security flaws. To build secure cyber systems, it is necessary to protect not only the computers and networks that make up these systems but their human users as well.