Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Cyber

Relating to digital systems and information

Showing 113 results for Cyber RSS
The goal of the Safer Warfighter Communications (SAFER) program is to develop technology that will enable safe, resilient communications over the Internet, particularly in situations in which a third-party is attempting to discover the identity or location of the end users, or block the communication. The technology developed through the program will also provide the quality of service (QoS) required to support applications such as instant messaging, electronic mail, social networking, streaming video, voice over Internet protocol (VoIP), video conferencing and other media that promote effective communication.
It is easy to reverse engineer software today. An attacker generally requires no more than a basic debugger, a compiler and about a day's effort to de-obfuscate code that has been obfuscated with the best current methods. The reason for the relative ease is that program obfuscation is primarily based on "security through obscurity" strategies, typified by inserting passive junk code into a program’s source code. Existing program obfuscation methods also do not have quantifiable security models, and so it is difficult even to measure how much security is gained by a given obfuscation effort.
A zero-knowledge (ZK) proof is an interactive protocol between a prover and a verifier. The prover creates a statement that they want the verifier to accept, using knowledge that will remain hidden from the verifier. Recent research has substantially increased the efficiency of ZK proofs, enabling real-world use, primarily by cryptocurrencies. While useful for cryptocurrencies, the ZK proofs created are specialized for this task and do not necessarily scale for transactions that are more complex. For highly complex proof statements like those that the Department of Defense (DoD) may wish to employ, novel and more efficient approaches are needed.
Serial Interactions in Imperfect Information Games Applied to Complex Military Decision Making (SI3-CMD) builds on recent developments in artificial intelligence and game theory to enable more effective decisions in adversarial domains. SI3-CMD will explore several military decision making applications at strategic, tactical, and operational levels and develop AI/game theory techniques appropriate for their problem characteristics.
As new defensive technologies make old classes of vulnerability difficult to exploit successfully, adversaries move to new classes of vulnerability. Vulnerabilities based on flawed implementations of algorithms have been popular targets for many years. However, once new defensive technologies make vulnerabilities based on flawed implementations less common and more difficult to exploit, adversaries will turn their attention to vulnerabilities inherent in the algorithms themselves.