Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyTagged Content List

Harnessing Complexity

Systems comprising multiple and diverse interactions

Showing 4 results for Complexity + Cyber RSS
DARPA's Defense Sciences Office (DSO) identifies and pursues high-risk, high-payoff research initiatives across a broad spectrum of science and engineering disciplines and transforms them into important, new game-changing technologies for U.S. national security. Current DSO themes include frontiers in math, computation and design, limits of sensing and sensors, complex social systems, and anticipating surprise. DSO relies on the greater scientific research community to help identify and explore ideas that could potentially revolutionize the state-of-the-art.
04/18/2018
Today, Commercial off-the-shelf (COTS), Government off-the-shelf (GOTS), and Free and open-source (FOSS) software support nearly all aspects of DoD, military, and commercial operations. Securing this diverse technology base requires highly skilled hackers who reason about the functionality of software and identify novel vulnerabilities, using a suite of tools and techniques that require extensive training. While effective, the process is largely manual and requires hundreds, if not thousands, of hours of effort for each vulnerability discovered.
April 19, 2018, 1:00 PM EST,
DARPA Conference Center
DARPA’s Information Innovation Office is hosting a Proposers Day to provide information to potential applicants on the structure and objectives of the Computers and Humans Exploring Software Security (CHESS) program. The goal of the CHESS program is to research the effectiveness of enabling computers and humans to collaboratively reason over software artifacts (e.g., source code, compiled binaries, etc.) for the purpose of finding zero-day vulnerabilities at a scale and speed appropriate for the complex software ecosystem upon which the U.S. Government, military, and economy depend.
The Department of Defense (DoD) maintains information systems that depend on Commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) software, Government off-the-shelf (GOTS) software, and Free and open source (FOSS) software. Securing this diverse technology base requires highly skilled hackers who reason about the functionality of software and identify novel vulnerabilities.